Cart
Checkout Secure

 

Multiple Items, One Low Shipping Fee  

Have a question? Contact us

customer-service@for-dogs-sake.com

Information about Corneal Dystrophy

Corneal Dystrophy

Corneal dystrophy is a group of disorders, characterised by a non-inflammatory, inherited, bilateral opacity of the transparent front part of the eye called the cornea. It is commonly seen in humans as well as dogs. It is rare in cats.

Signs and symptoms

Corneal dystrophy may not significantly affect vision in the early stages. However, it does not require proper evaluation and treatment for restoration of optimal vision. It can, however, rarely cause corneal ulceration, especially with epithelial dystrophy. It appears as grayish white lines, circles, or clouding of the cornea. Corneal dystrophy can also have a crystalline appearance.


Treatment

Corneal dystrophy in dogs usually does not cause any problems and treatment is not required.
Many breeds are affected by corneal dystrophy with many different appearances. These breeds most commonly have these criteria.

* Airedale Terrier - occurs at 4 to 12 months of age in the central cornea. It is progressive and can cause decreased vision.
* Alaskan Malamute - occurs at greater than two years of age in the central cornea.
* Beagle - has a nebular, race track, or arcing appearance.
* Bearded Collie - occurs at greater than one year of age in the lateral or central cornea and can affect just one eye.
* Bichon Frise - occurs at greater than two years of age in the inferior or central cornea.
* Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - occurs at two to four years of age in the central cornea.
* American Cocker Spaniel
* Rough Collie - occurs at one to four years of age in the inferior or central cornea.
* English Toy Spaniel - occurs at two to five years of age and has a crystalline, circular appearance.
* German Shepherd Dog - occurs at one to six years of age and is usually oval.
* Golden Retriever - occurs at less than two years of age and can be progressive.
* Italian Greyhound - occurs in young dogs and is focal.
* Lhasa Apso - oval appearance.
* Mastiff - oval appearance.
* Miniature Pinscher - occurs at one to two years of age and is oval.
* Norwich Terrier - peripheral cornea.
* Pembroke Welsh Corgi - occurs in young dogs and can include blood vessels and pigmentation.
* Pointer - gray, hazy ring.
* Poodle - occurs at greater than one year of age.
* Samoyed - oocurs at six months to two years of age and is gray and round.
* Shetland Sheepdog - occurs at two to four years of age as multiple gray/white rings. It can develop into a corneal ulcer.
* Siberian Husky - occurs at five months to two years of age and is gray and oval.
* Weimaraner - Occurs at one to eight years of age in the central cornea.
* Whippet - occurs at three to five years of age in the central cornea.

Added to cart!
Multiple Items, One Low Shipping Fee Free shipping when you order over XX You Have Qualified for Free Shipping PLEASE NOTE: The Christmas order cutoff has now passed. Orders placed after 8pm on Sunday the 16th December will NOT be dispatched until Monday the 7th January. You Have Achieved Free Shipping Buy 2 or More Signs & Get 50% Off Back Off Sign Multiple Items, One Low Shipping Fee You Have Achieved Free Shipping Free shipping when you order over XX ou Have Qualified for Free Shipping